Area sensors

Area sensors

Area sensors are composed of an emitter and a receiver. The emitter has an optical unit which consists of an array of photoemitters which emit a series of light pulses towards the receiver. The photoreceivers present in the receiver's optical unit convert the light radiation into an electrical signal that drives the sensor output stage. Detection occurs when the beam path is interrupted by the presence of an opaque object. There are three operating systems:

Parallel rays scan: each pulse emitted by a single element of the emitter array must be read synchronously by the corresponding element of the receiver array. Scanning determines an area crossed by parallel rays which allows you to obtain precise information on the size and position of the target object.
Crossed rays scan: each pulse emitted by a single element of the array of emitters must be read synchronously by the corresponding element of the array of receivers, and by a variable number of other receivers positioned on both sides of the central one. The use of crossed beams does not allow to obtain precise information on the size and position of the target but simply reveals its presence.
Synchronous scan: è the function that allows a single element of the array of receivers to be enabled to read only when the light impulse is sent by the corresponding emitter element. Synchronization is used to determine a close relationship between the corresponding emitter and receiver in order to reduce the effects of interference from other signals.

Main typologies:

Medium resolution parallelepiped body Medium resolution parallelepiped Learn more...
Medium resolution without case Medium resolution without case Learn more...
Polarized retroreflection Polarized retroreflection Learn more...
High resolution compact body High resolution compact body Learn more...
High resolution parallelepiped body High resolution parallelepiped body Learn more...